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My Role as your Mediator

Over many years, I have acquired the skills and experience to assess a wide range of property related matters. I do not solve these problems or impose solutions on the parties. Neither do I act as an advisor to either party. Instead, I stand impartially between them in order to help them to find their own solutions.
While there are well-established guidelines for mediation, the process is flexible to suit both parties. In general, I aim to:

• select a neutral location where the group has the use of three room
• review all the necessary information to identify key aims and objectives that could form the basis of an agreement
• start with a face to face discussion in which each party outlines to the other how they see the issues in dispute
• move the parties into separate rooms and move between them, conveying each of the ideas and points of view to the other
• re-open the lines of communication whilst allowing each party to express what could be quite strong emotions in a controlled environment
• maintain the dynamism of the process, in order to preserve the parties’ optimism and interest
• convey all offers and counter-offers in a non-challenging and non-judgmental manner
• keep everything in perspective by helping to identify what might potentially be agreed and contrast it with what might be lost if the dispute was subsequently taken to court
• assist with preparing a contract with any attending legal advisors when you and the other party have decided how you want to resolve your dispute. Once signed, this becomes a binding agreement and when the terms are fulfilled, the dispute is at an end.

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Mediation Information & Awareness Meetings

DIVORCE/SEPARATION MEDIATION – INFORMATION SHEET 1. Family mediation is done through a series of “sessions”, rather than a single session. 2. It is preferable if the sessions are carried out at a neutral venue, but cost may have a bearing on this. 3. Prior to the first session, the mediator must be satisfied that there …

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